St Katherine’s Parmoor

We have returned to work in the gardens at Parmoor after several years away. The specific project in which we will play a part is the restoration of the Victorian walled garden and the regeneration of the overgrown apple tress in the orchard to the south of the house.

We have started on both tasks already with some summer pruning of the overgrown box and honeysuckle hedges which surround the vegetable patches and walkways between them and next to the espalier fruit trees which line the walls.

Meeting Point

We meet On site.
St Katharine’s lies off the Hambleden to Frieth road.
Click here for a map

Site Coordinator

Site coordinator is Chris Ash

More Information

Click here to enter the official website of St Katherine’s Parmoor

Some of the history of Parmoor

The earliest records discovered relate to the 1370’s where the owners were Henry Edmund de Malyns and Reginald de Malyns.
The estate (called Pyremere) was described as having two messuages (the legal term for the combination of dwelling house, outbuilding, courtyard, orchard and garden) 140 acres of land and 2 acres of meadow.
The estate changed hands many times over the centuries until it was sold to Henry William Cripps Q.C. in 1860 by George Romsey and Ambrose Stephenson.
On February 8th 1892 the Revd. Richard Wallace Deane of Skirmett Manor sold Little Parmoor to Henry Cripps. The 3rd son of Henry Cripps, Charles Alfred KCVO became the first Baron Parmoor in 1914. The 4th Baron was (Frederick Alfred) Milo Cripps who passed away in 2008. The present Baron is (Michael Leonard) Seddon Cripps.
Parmoor House was let to King Zog of Albania, who was forced into exile when Mussolini invaded Albania in 1939.
King Zog lived with his Hungarian wife Queen Geraldine, their young son Prince Leka, members of his family, their servants and pets.
On February 11th 1947 the second Lord Parmoor sold the house and 12 acres to the Community of St. Katharine of Alexandria, a High Anglican Religious Community. In 1995 The Sue Ryder Prayer Fellowship took over Parmoor, now a Grade 2 Listed Building.

Comments are closed.